General Rules - Montreal Pool League

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These rules apply to all CSI tournaments, league play, and other CSI events. Unless clearly contradicted or suspended by specific game rules, the General Rules apply to all games.
1-1 Player Responsibility

1. You are responsible for knowing the rules, applied rulings, regulations, and schedules that pertain to any CSI event you enter. You are also responsible for cooperating with all referees and event officials, and for accurately providing all requested information concerning your participation in the event to referees and event officials when asked to do so.
2. Event officials and referees will provide information as required by the rules to the best of their ability and knowledge. However, Rule 1-1 takes precedence and the ultimate responsibility for knowing the correct information still rests with you. You may still incur penalties if you commit a foul or violate the rules as a result of incorrect information provided to you by an event official or referee. (A.R. 1-1)
1-2 Acceptance of Provided Equipment

1. Once your match begins, you accept all provided equipment as standard and legal. After a match has begun, only a referee or event official may declare the equipment defective or unsuitable for play. If the equipment is declared unsuitable for play, all games previously played on that equipment will be counted. (A.R. 1-2)
2. During a match, it is a foul if you attempt to modify provided equipment without the permission of a referee or event official. The foul occurs immediately upon the attempt, regardless of whether a stroke or shot is attempted. (A.R. 1-2)
1-3 Use of Equipment

CSI reserves the right to prohibit any equipment it deems untested or inappropriate, or that has not been evaluated by the CSI National Office.
1. You are responsible for all equipment and accessory items you bring to the table (A.R. 1-3). You may not use equipment or accessory items in a manner other than their intended use. Specifically:
a. You may use a billiards glove.
b. You may use either a built-in or an add-on cue extender.
c. You may use your own chalk provided that it closely matches the color of the cloth. (A.R. 1-3).
Penalty for (c): first offense – warning. Second and subsequent offenses – foul.
d. You may not shoot while using more than two mechanical bridges at any one time. A bridge may only be used to support the cue or another bridge. If two bridges are used, the upper bridge must rest on the head of the lower bridge. (A.R. 1-3).
e. You may not shoot while using any item to support or elevate your bridge hand. You may hold chalk in your bridge hand while bridging, but the chalk may not be used to elevate your hand off the table.
Penalty for (d-e): foul upon execution of the shot. If no shot is executed then there is no foul.
f. You may use your cue, held in your hand or not, to help align a shot. You may use your cue and hands to measure angles and distances for bank shots and kick shots. No other cues, bridges or equipment may be used. (A.R. 1-3).
g. You may only use your vision to judge whether the cue ball or an object ball would fit through a gap, or to judge what ball the cue ball would contact first. You may not use any ball, cue, rack, chalk cube, or any other equipment or other part of your body as a width-measuring device. (A.R. 1-3).
Penalty for (f-g): Foul immediately upon the violation, regardless of whether a shot is executed.
2. You may not wear any electronic headgear, use any electronic device, or voluntarily impede your hearing during a match. Examples include, but are not limited to:
a. Use of headphones, earphones, or earplugs of any kind, including Bluetooth accessories, whether turned on or not. Hearing aids are permitted.
b. Use of cell phones, smart phones, pagers, or music devices. Cell phones may be worn on the belt or kept in pockets, but may not be accessed for messages, information or conversations at any time during a match by singles or scotch doubles players, or during your game in team play. You must turn off all audible ringers and other notification tones while on the event floor.
The penalty for the first violation of Rule 1-3-2 during an event is a warning. Each subsequent violation is a foul.
1-4 Cue Requirements

1. Your cues must meet CSI specifications.
2. It is a foul if you shoot with a cue that does not meet CSI specifications. The cue must be removed from play.(AR 1-4-2)
1-5 Start Time of Match

The start time for your match is the scheduled time or the time the match is announced, whichever is later. If you are not present at the table with your equipment within the time allowed by Tournament Administrators, you lose the match by forfeit. (AR-1-5)
1-6 Playing Without a Referee

When a referee is not available, the Tournament Director or designated event official will fulfill the duties of the referee.
1-7 Beginning and End of Game or Match

1. Your match or game begins when the cue tip strikes the cue ball during any stroke on the break shot. (AR 1-7)
2. Your match or game ends when the game-winning ball is legally pocketed and all balls on the table have stopped moving. After that time, there can be no fouls involving the game on the table for that game. However, unsportsmanlike conduct immediately after a game or match may be penalized by loss of that game or match, or by other penalty at the referee’s discretion.
1-8 No Practice Allowed During Match (Tournament Play Only)

1. It is a foul if you practice at any time during your match, including during time-outs and periods of suspended play. "Practice" is defined as any stroke or shot that is not a part of your match, taken on any table at the event venue. (AR 1-8)
2. During a match, if the first offense of a practice foul occurs between games there is no penalty applied, but a warning will be issued. For second and subsequent offenses between games during a match, the offended player:
a. Is awarded the option to break if it is not their turn to break. If the offended player chooses to take the break, the breaking order for future games is not affected.
b. Is awarded ball in hand on the first shot after the break if it is their turn to break. The penalty is not applied if there is a foul on the break.
3. In team play, this rule applies to all members of the team that are in the teams line-up, whether or not they are playing at the time and whether or not they are listed on the score sheet of the match in progress. Penalties for fouls in team play:
a. For violations by a player who is playing a game at the time of the foul: the penalty is applied to that player’s table only;
b. For violations by a player who is not playing a game at the time of the foul: the penalty is applied to all tables assigned to the match. (AR 1-8)
1-9 Stopping Play

1. You may stop play to request the assistance of a referee if you believe that a foul may occur or has occurred, or if you need information concerning the rules. If you desire to stop play, you must notify your opponent and your opponent must acknowledge your request. If it is your opponent’s inning, you must notify them before they are down on the shot. It is a foul if you interrupt your opponent after they are down on a shot. (AR 1-9)
2. If your opponent requests that play be stopped in order to summon a referee or other event official, you must acknowledge and honor that request. After play has stopped, it is a foul if you take any stroke or shot until a referee authorizes you to shoot.
1-10 Suspended Play

Play may be suspended at the referee's discretion. It is a foul if you take any stroke or shot while play is suspended. (AR 1-10)
1-11 Time-Out

If time-outs are allowed by event regulations, you may only take a time-out during your inning, or when it is your turn to break. Each player is allowed one time-out per match. Time-outs are limited to five minutes. If you exceed your allotted five minutes, or leave the playing area when not authorized to do so, you will forfeit one game for every two-minute period you fail to return to the match. The two-minute period begins once a referee has determined you are not present when you should be. Time-outs are not allowed in team play during CSI sanctioned tournaments. (AR 1-11)
1-12 Lag for Break

This rule applies if players are required to lag by event regulations.
1. The lag begins with each player having ball in hand behind the head string, one to the left of the long string and one to the right. The balls must be of equal size and weight. The players shoot at approximately the same time toward the foot cushion. The ball must contact the foot cushion. When the balls come to rest, the player whose ball is closest to the head cushion wins the lag. The players will lag again if the lag is a tie, or if one player strikes the ball after the other player's ball has contacted the foot cushion.
2. You lose the lag if your ball:
a. does not contact the foot cushion;
b. contacts the foot cushion more than once;
c. crosses the long string;
d. contacts a side cushion;
e. is pocketed or jumped off the table;
f. comes to rest past the nose of the head cushion (see Diagram 3).
3. The player who wins the lag may either break or require their opponent to break.
1-13 Breaking Subsequent Games of a Match

In matches consisting of multiple games, the Administrative Authority of the event will set the procedure for determining which player or team will break subsequent racks. (A.R. 1-13)
1-14 Racking Procedures

1. You must rack for yourself when you are breaking. (Exception: 14.1 Continuous)
2. You must rack the balls as tightly as possible. Each ball should touch all balls adjacent to it. (A.R. 1-14)
3. After you rack the balls, your opponent may inspect the rack but must not touch any ball. If your opponent is not satisfied with the rack, they may require you to re-rack the balls one time. After one re-rack, if both players cannot agree that the rack is suitable for play a referee must be called. The referee will then rack the balls for that game. If the referee racks the balls, the opponent may inspect the rack but must accept the rack as is.
4. You should refrain from tapping balls unless necessary. It is preferable to brush the area of the rack and ensure that the spot attached to the cloth, if any, is in good condition.
5. If the arrangement of the rack does not meet the requirements of the specific game, it will be corrected without penalty. If your opponent's rack does not meet the requirements and you do not notify them before they break, the game will continue with no penalty.
1-15 Shot Clock Procedures

1. There is normally no time limit for you to take a shot. However, a referee may implement a shot clock if they judge that you are delaying a match unnecessarily or in an unsportsmanlike manner, or if event officials require that a match proceed at a faster pace. (A.R. 1-15)
2. You may call a referee if you believe your opponent is deliberately or consistently playing at an abnormally slow pace. If, after a reasonable period of observation, the referee judges that slow play is occurring, they will warn the offending player(s). After the warning, if the referee judges that the pace of play remains abnormally slow, they will place the player(s) on a 45-second shot clock.
3. Shot clock procedures are:
a. The shot clock does not apply to the first shot after the break in any game.
b. During a player’s inning, the shot clock starts when the previous shot ends and runs for 45 seconds or until cue tip to cue ball contact begins the next shot. If a player has ball in hand, the shot clock starts when the player has possession of the cue ball and any spotting of balls or racking is finished.
c. If they are not already down on the shot when ten seconds remain on the shot clock, the player will receive a ten second warning from the referee (announced as clearly as “ten”, loudly enough for the shooter to hear). If the player does not strike the cue ball within ten seconds, it is a foul. (A.R. 1-15)
d. If a player is already down on the shot with ten seconds remaining, no announcement is made. The shot clock will pause at ten seconds and the player may exceed the 45-second limit provided they do not stand up off the shot. However, if the player stands up off the shot, the referee will immediately announce “ten”, and the shot clock will resume. If the player does not strike the cue ball within ten seconds, it is foul. (A.R. 1-15)
e. For timing purposes, “down on the shot” means the player is in a customary shooting position as it relates to their bridge hand and grip of the cue, or, if using a mechanical bridge, the bridge has been placed for the shot and the cue placed in the bridge’s groove with the player’s grip hand on the cue.
f. Each player is permitted one 45-second extension per rack. If both players are on the hill, each player is permitted two 45-second extensions. To use an extension, the player must verbally announce “extension” to the referee. The referee will then respond with “extension” or, if the player has no extension remaining, “extension not allowed”. For extensions, procedures with ten seconds remaining are the same as for other shots. g. The shot clock will pause if play is stopped to summon a referee, and will start again when the referee authorizes the player to shoot. In a game in which a referee is presiding, the shot clock will pause if play must be delayed to allow the referee to take up a position, examine the table, or for any other administrative stoppage. In either case (referee presiding or not), after an administrative stoppage the shot clock may, at the referee’s discretion, be reset before authorizing the player to shoot.
1-16 Calling Ball and Pocket (A.R. 1-16)

Rule 1-16 applies only to games designated by specific game rules as Call Shot games.
1. You must designate the called ball and the called pocket before each shot. You may make the designation verbally or by a clear, unambiguous gesture. You are not required
to call obvious shots. You are not required to indicate incidental kisses and caroms, or incidental cushion contacts that do not constitute bank shots or kick shots. Not all kisses, caroms and cushion contacts are incidental. If a dispute arises as to whether a shot was obvious based on such contact, the referee is the sole judge. (A.R. 1-16)
2. You may only call one ball on a shot. If you call more than one ball, or if you use any conditional phrase such as “just in case” concerning possibly pocketing more than one ball, your inning ends after the shot regardless of whether you pocket any ball. Any ball pocketed on such a shot is an illegally pocketed ball. Your opponent accepts the table in position. (10-Ball exception: Rule 4-8, Opponent’s Option, applies.)
3. If you are not certain what shot your opponent is attempting, it is your responsibility to ask. You must ask before your opponent is down on the shot. With the exception of shots defined as not obvious, if you do not ask and a dispute arises as to whether the shot was obvious, the referee is the sole judge.
4. You must always call shots that are defined as not obvious. This rule applies regardless of whether or not your opponent asks about the shot, and regardless of how simple or obvious the shot may appear.
5. When calling shots defined as not obvious, you are only required to designate the called ball and called pocket. If shooting a combination shot, you do not have to say the word “combination”, or state which ball will be struck first or the sequence of balls. When shooting a bank shot or kick shot you do not have to say the word “bank” or “kick” nor specify which cushions will be involved in the shot.
6. When the game winning ball is your legal object ball, if you pocket the ball on a shot defined as not obvious but fail to call the shot: your inning ends, the ball is spotted, and the incoming player must accept the table in position. Exception: Rule 1-16-6 does not apply to 8-Ball. (See Rule 2-10-e.)
7. If you do not call a shot defined as not obvious and you pocket any ball on such a shot, your inning ends. The incoming player accepts the table in position.
8. A shot that was obvious prior to the shot will count for the shooter if the shot inadvertently:
a. becomes a bank shot because the called ball did not go directly into the called pocket but instead contacted two or more cushions prior to being pocketed in the called pocket, or;
b. becomes a kick shot because the cue ball initially missed the called ball, contacted one or more cushions, and then pocketed the called ball in the called pocket.
1-17 Calling a Safety (This rule applies to 8-Ball and 14.1 Continuous)

1. If playing a safety, you must communicate with your opponent in a clear and
unambiguous manner. Safeties must be called verbally – gestures are not sufficient, no
matter how clear they may appear.
2. The non-shooting player has responsibilities when a safety is called, and should
acknowledge a called safety in a clear and unambiguous manner. If a dispute arises as to
whether a safety was called, the referee is the sole judge.
1-18 Legal Stroke

You must use a legal stroke. Any lifting, sideways, or other brushing motion of the cue,
such that the force that propels the cue ball does not primarily result from a forward
motion of the cue as defined under “Legal Stroke”, is a foul (see Diagram 4).
1-19 Legal Shot (A.R. 1-19 )

1. For a shot to be legal, the first ball contacted by the cue ball must be a legal object
ball, or a simultaneous hit with a legal and illegal object ball may occur. After that contact:
a. any object ball must be pocketed, or;
b. any object ball or the cue ball must contact a cushion.
It is a foul if one of those requirements is not met.
2. If the ball used to meet the cushion contact requirement of Rule 1-19-1-b is declared
frozen to a cushion at the beginning of the shot, then that ball must leave the cushion it is
frozen to and then:
a. contact a cushion other than the one to which it was frozen, or;
b. contact another object ball before it contacts the cushion to which it was
frozen.
3. The shot detailed in Diagram 5 meets the requirements of paragraph Rule 1-19-2 and is legal.
4. An object ball is not considered frozen to a cushion unless it is declared frozen immediately prior to the shot and before the shooter is down on the shot.
5. Contacting a ball frozen to a cushion does not constitute contacting that cushion.
1-20 Cue Ball Frozen to Object Ball or Cushion (A.R. 1-20)

1. The cue ball is not considered frozen to an object ball or cushion unless it is declared frozen immediately prior to the shot.
2. If the cue ball is frozen to a legal object ball, it is legal to shoot toward the object ball provided you use a legal stroke.
3. If the cue ball is frozen to a cushion, it is legal to shoot the cue ball into the cushion provided you use a legal stroke.
4. Despite the legality of the stroke with respect to the cue ball and frozen ball or cushion, the presence of one or more other object balls or a cushion nearby a frozen cue ball or object ball may create the possibility of a violation of Rule 1-30 involving the cue ball and the nearby ball or cushion.
5. Shooting the cue ball away from an object ball that is frozen to the cue ball does not constitute contacting that object ball.
1-21 Penalties for Fouls

1. If you commit a foul, or otherwise violate the rules, you are penalized according to the General Rules and the specific rules of the game being played.
2. Unless otherwise stated in the General Rules or specific game rules, if you commit a foul or otherwise violate the rules: your inning ends and your opponent receives ball in hand.
3. Some fouls specify a warning for the first offense during a match. However, if you continually commit such fouls from match to match, it may be considered Unsportsmanlike Conduct and the penalties for the first offense of those fouls may be more severe.
1-22 Successive Fouls

This rule applies to 9-Ball, 10-Ball, 14.1 Continuous and One Pocket.
1. You always begin a game with a successive foul count of zero. When you commit a foul, your successive foul count is one (referred to as “on one foul”) and you incur the normal penalty for the foul.
2. When you are on one foul, if your next shot is legal, your successive foul count resets to zero. If you fail to make a legal shot, your successive foul count is two (referred to as “on two fouls”.) You also incur the normal penalty for the second foul.
3. When you are on two fouls, if your next shot is legal, your successive foul count resets to zero. If you fail to make a legal shot, your successive foul count is three and you incur the penalty indicated by specific game rules. After the penalty, your successive foul count resets to zero.
4. When your opponent is on two fouls: before your opponent shoots, you or a referee must warn them that they are on two fouls, and they must acknowledge the warning. If the warning is not issued and they foul on their next shot:
a. it is not considered a third successive foul;
b. they incur the normal penalty for a foul, but not the penalty for three successive fouls;
c. their foul count remains at two.
1-23 Calling Fouls / Fouls Not Called

1. A foul may only be called by a player playing in the game or by a referee that has been properly called to the table. See Rule 1.41, Coaching, for more information concerning exceptions in team play. (A.R. 1-23)
2. Any foul not called before the next stroke is taken is considered to have not occurred. The failure to call a foul on any previous shot does not restrict the ability to call a similar foul on any future shot.
1-24 Multiple Fouls

If you commit more than one foul during a shot, only the foul that carries the most severe penalty is enforced. However, unsportsmanlike conduct may be penalized in conjunction with any foul or violation. (A.R. 1-24)
1-25 One Foot on the Floor

It is a foul if you do not have at least one foot in contact with the floor when the cue tip strikes the cue ball. Footwear must be worn and be normal with regard to size, shape, and manner of wear.
1-26 Balls in Motion

It is a foul if you shoot while any ball on the table is in motion. A spinning ball is in motion.
1-27 Scratch

It is a foul if you scratch.
1-28 Jumped Balls

It is a foul if you cause any ball to be jumped off the table. (A.R. 1-28)
1-29 Push Shot

It is a foul if you shoot a push shot.
1-30 Double Hit (A.R. 1-30)

1. It is a foul if your cue tip strikes the cue ball more than once on a single shot.
2. It is a foul if your cue tip is still in contact with the cue ball when the cue ball strikes an object ball. However, such a stroke may be considered legal if the object ball is legal and cue ball strikes it at a very fine angle.
1-31 Simultaneous Hit (Material moved to Rule 1-19-1. No change in content.)

For a shot to be legal, the first ball contacted by the cue ball must be a legal object ball, or a simultaneous hit with a legal and illegal object ball may occur.
1-32 Miscues

A miscue is not necessarily a foul. (A.R. 1-32)
1-33 Disturbed Balls (Cue Ball Fouls Only) (A.R. 1-33)

1. During a game, it is not a foul if you accidentally touch or move a single stationary object ball with any part of your body, clothing or equipment, unless the disturbed ball has an effect on the outcome of the shot.
2. "Effect on the outcome of the shot" means that either the disturbed ball contacts any ball set in motion as a result of the shot, or that the base of any ball set in motion as a result of the shot passes through the area originally occupied by the disturbed ball. That area is defined as a circle approximately seven inches in diameter centered on the position originally occupied by the disturbed ball (see Diagram 6).
3. If a disturbed ball has no effect on the outcome of the shot, your opponent has the option to leave the disturbed ball where it came to rest or to restore it to its original position before the next shot. If the disturbed ball is to be restored, a referee may restore it, your opponent may restore it, or you may restore it with your opponent’s permission. It is a foul if you touch or restore the disturbed ball without your opponent's permission.
4. It is a foul if a disturbed ball has an effect on the outcome of the shot. Your opponent has no restoration option.
5. If you disturb a single object ball and, in the same shot, commit a foul that is not related to the disturbed ball: you are penalized for the foul, and your opponent has the restoration option for the disturbed ball that was not involved in the foul.
6. If a single disturbed ball falls into a pocket with no effect on the outcome of a shot, your opponent has the restoration option. However, if the disturbed ball is designated by specific game rules as the game winning ball, it must be restored. If the game-winning ball is disturbed and falls into a pocket when there is an effect on the outcome of the shot, it is loss of game.
7. It is a foul if:
a. you disturb the cue ball;
b. you disturb more than one object ball;
c. a disturbed ball contacts any other ball;
d. you disturb a ball that is in motion.
Your opponent has no restoration option. If the game-winning ball is disturbed in conjunction with a violation of (a) through (d) and falls into a pocket, it is loss of game.
1-34 Jump Shots and Massé Shots

1. Jump shots are legal shots. However, it is a foul if you intentionally cause the cue ball to rise off the bed of the table by "digging under" or "scooping" the cue ball with the cue. If such a motion is unintentional, it is considered a miscue, and not a foul in and of itself. (A.R. 1-34)
2. If you attempt to jump over or massé around an impeding illegal object ball then Rule 1-33, Disturbed Balls, does not apply to the impeding ball for that shot. If the impeding illegal object ball moves during the stroke it is a foul regardless of whether it was moved by your equipment or any part of your body.
1-35 Position of Ball

The position of a ball is determined by its base (see Diagram 7).
1-36 Shooting with Ball in Hand Behind the Head String (A.R. 1-36)

1. When you have ball in hand behind the head string, it is a foul if the first ball contacted by the cue ball is behind the head string unless, before contacting that ball, you first shoot the cue ball past the head string and it contacts a cushion at a point below the head string.
2. It is a foul if, before contacting the first object ball, the first cushion contacted by the cue ball is behind the head string.
3. When you have ball in hand behind the head string, it is a foul if you place the ball outside of the kitchen and shoot.
1-37 (Reserved for Future Use)
1-38 Ball in Hand Placement

1. When you have ball in hand, you may use your hand or any part of your cue, including the tip, to position the cue ball. If you use your cue to place the cue ball, any action that would be a legal stroke will be considered a shot, and must meet the requirements of a legal shot or it is a foul. (A.R. 1-38)
2. Once you have picked up or moved the cue ball to take ball in hand, it remains in hand until it is contacted by the tip on your next stroke. You may place the cue ball, pick it up or move it again, and replace it successive times until you take that stroke. (A.R. 1-38)
3. Immediately after a foul, when you are picking up or moving the cue ball the first time to take ball in hand (as opposed to placing the cue ball or picking it up again for successive placements before the next shot), the provisions of Rule 1-33-1 apply to touching or disturbing a single object ball with the cue ball or your hand. You may request that a referee pick the cue ball up for you immediately after a foul. (A.R. 1-38)
4. When placing or moving the cue ball, it is a foul if you touch or disturb any object ball with the cue ball or your hand that holds the cue ball. Your "hand" is defined as including the wrist up to a point where a wristwatch would normally be worn. Your opponent has no restoration option.
1-39 Marking the Table

It is a foul if you intentionally mark the table in any way to assist you in executing any shot or future shot. Marking includes the deliberate placement of chalk or any other object at a specific point on a rail or cushion to aid the alignment of a shot, or placing any mark on any part of the table. The foul occurs at the moment you mark the table, regardless of whether you remove the mark or whether a shot is taken.
1-40 Deliberate Foul

During a game, it is a deliberate foul if you commit any of the following acts, whether shooting or not. In addition to the penalties under the General Rules and specific game rules, you incur additional penalties if indicated, and upon the first violation you will receive a mandatory warning that second and subsequent violations of the same sub-section during the match will be penalized by loss of game. (Exception: see Rule 6-17 for penalties in 14.1 Continuous.)
a. Deflecting cue ball on a break shot: After a stroke on a break shot, including a miscue, it is a deliberate foul if you intentionally touch or deflect the cue ball. The break is illegal, regardless of whether the cue ball contacts the rack, or whether specific game rules for break shots are met. Your opponent may either re-rack and break or require you to re-rack and break again. (Exception: no re-rack in 9-Ball or 10-ball.)
b. Cue ball: It is a deliberate foul if you intentionally:
1) strike, move or deflect the cue ball with anything other than your cue tip (except when you have ball in hand);
2) pick up or contact the cue ball while it or any other ball is in motion;
3) end your inning by picking up the cue ball, or by refusing to shoot (A.R. 1-40);
4) cause the cue ball to move by contacting or moving any part of the table in any way. (A.R. 1-40)
c. Object balls: It is a deliberate foul if you intentionally stop or deflect any object ball that is in motion, or intentionally move any stationary object ball that is in play, by any method other than a legal shot, including by intentionally contacting or moving any part of the table in any way. (A.R. 1-40)
Penalties First violation of (c): your opponent may have the object ball restored (if it was stationary), pocketed or left in its position after the foul. However, it is loss of game if it is the game-winning ball, if any deflected object ball contacts any other ball, or if more than one ball is moved.
d. Placing hand in pocket: It is a deliberate foul if you catch any ball that is falling into a pocket, or place your hand into a pocket while any ball in play is in motion near that pocket. (A.R. 1-40)
First violation of (d): if the cue ball, ball in hand. If an object ball, your opponent may have the ball placed along the lip of the pocket, pocketed, or left in position. However, it is loss of game if the ball involved is the game winning ball. (8-Ball exception for first violation: if the 8-ball is involved and it is the break shot, it is not loss of game).
1-41 Coaching

1. During your match, it is a foul if you ask for, or intentionally receive, assistance in planning or executing any shot.
2. It is a foul if you receive unsolicited assistance from a spectator associated with you (e.g., spouse/partner, relative, teammate). “Assistance” includes being alerted to an opponent’s foul.
3. If you are not aware of an opponent’s foul, and you are alerted to the foul by unsolicited information from a spectator not associated with you, the foul is not enforceable but you do not incur any additional penalty. Exception: In scotch doubles or team play, a violation of Rule 1.8, No Practice Allowed During Match, may be called on any member of the opponent’s team by any member of the offended team, regardless of whether they or the offending player are at the table or involved in a game. Other modifications of Rule 1-41 concerning team or doubles play may be made by the Administrative Authority.
4. Any spectator not associated with you who offers any significant unsolicited assistance to you, whether verbal or non-verbal, will be warned against further interruptions or removed from the area.
5. The Administrative Authority of the event may modify this rule for team or doubles play. (A.R. 1-41)
1-42 Non-Shooting Player Requirement

1. It is unsportsmanlike conduct if you intentionally distract your opponent or interfere with their play. (A.R. 1-42)
2. The non-shooting player has an obligation to pay attention to the game on the table, which includes clearly and unambiguously acknowledging called shots and safeties. In the event of a dispute over whether a shot or safety was properly called, the referee is the sole judge.
3. If asked, the non-shooting player must provide information to you concerning the game on the table (e.g., who has which group in 8-Ball, or whether they committed a foul, etc.).
If, as the non-shooting player, you do provide information to your opponent, you must do so in good faith and, to the best of your ability, provide correct information. The non-shooting player is not protected by Rule 1-1-2 from giving incorrect information, and may incur penalties by giving incorrect information. (A.R. 1-42)
1-43 Concession of Game

1. You must not concede any game at any time for any reason. “Concede” means that, as a result of any verbal or non-verbal action, you lead your opponent to believe that you are awarding them the game before its normal conclusion on the table. Before a game has ended, you must refrain from making any statements such as “good game”, etc., or any other verbal inference that the game is over or that your opponent is certain or likely to win. You must also refrain from any similar non-verbal action, such as putting away your cue or accessory items, beginning to mark a score sheet, changing clothes, retrieving or juggling coins or tokens, etc. Whether or not you have conceded a game is determined solely by the referee’s judgment.
2. If you concede a game, in addition to losing that game you will receive a mandatory warning against further concessions. A second violation results in the loss of the conceded game and an additional deduction of one game from your score (if you have zero games, your score would be "minus one game") and a final mandatory warning. A third violation results in loss of match. In team play, any member of the team may commit the second or third violations. (A.R. 1-43)
3. In the absence of any act by your opponent judged to be a concession under Rule 1-43-1, you must not assume that your opponent has conceded the game. If you disturb the position of the table in such a situation, then you are charged with a concession violation. (A.R. 1-43)
4. If you disturb the position of the table in an act that presumes the game is over before it is actually over, such as gathering balls together to rack the next game, you lose the game. (A.R. 1-43)
1-44 Concession of Match

When your opponent is on the hill, if you make a motion to unscrew your playing cue during your opponent's inning you lose the match. (A.R. 1-44)
1-45 Unsportsmanlike Conduct (A.R. 1-45)

1. You must not commit any act that is unsportsmanlike in nature. This includes, but is not limited to: actions that are embarrassing, disruptive, or detrimental to other players, spectators, referees, event officials, or the sport in general, or any act that makes a travesty of the game. Offering to gamble with opponents or spectators during your match is specifically defined as unsportsmanlike conduct.
2. You are responsible for your actions at all times while you are present at the event
3. You may be penalized for unsportsmanlike conduct with or without warning. Penalties for unsportsmanlike conduct are at the discretion of the referee or other designated event officials, and may vary based upon the referee’s or event official’s judgment of the severity and nature of the unsportsmanlike act. A player’s pattern of behavior from prior events may also be considered.
4. A foul with a specified progression of penalties may have a more serious penalty applied early in the progression if it is committed willfully or in an unsportsmanlike manner, or if it is committed intentionally in consecutive matches.
5. Unsportsmanlike conduct warnings and penalties carry forward and are cumulativeduring the entire event.
6. Disqualification from any CSI event for unsportsmanlike conduct will result in forfeiture of any prize money, trophy, or award won by that player or team. In addition, any championship recognition will not be entered in the official records of the event.
1-46 Spotting Balls

1. Balls to be spotted are placed on the long string with the number facing up. A single ball is placed on the foot spot. If more than one ball is to be spotted, they are placed on the long string in ascending numerical order, beginning on the foot spot and moving toward the foot of the table (see Diagram 8).
2. If other balls interfere with spotting, the ball(s) to be spotted will be placed on the long string below the foot spot, but as close as possible to the foot spot, without moving the interfering balls. If there is no space available on the long string below the foot spot, they will be placed on the long string above the foot spot, but as close as possible to the foot spot, without moving the interfering balls (see Diagram 9).
3. Whenever possible, spotted balls will be placed frozen to interfering object balls or other spotted balls. If the cue ball is the interfering ball, the spotted ball will be placed as closely as possible to the cue ball without being frozen to it. (A.R. 1-46)
1-47 Jawed Balls

If balls are wedged in the mouth of a pocket, a referee will inspect them and judge whether, if they were free to fall directly downward, the balls would come to rest on the bed of the table or in the pocket. The referee will then place the balls in the positions as judged and play will continue.
1-48 Non-Player Interference

If balls move because of the action of a non-player or other influence beyond the control of the players, a referee will restore the balls as nearly as possible to their original positions and play will continue. If the interference occurs during a shot and has an effect on the outcome of the shot, the shooter shoots again after the restoration. In either case, if the referee judges that restoration is not possible, the game will be replayed with the player who broke the game breaking again. Balls moved under such circumstances do not meet the definition of disturbed balls and Rule 1-33 does not apply. (A.R. 1-48)
1-49 Balls Settling or Moving

1. If a ball settles or otherwise moves by itself, it will remain in the position it assumed and play continues. It is not a foul if a ball settles or otherwise moves by itself as you are shooting. If a ball that you are shooting at settles while you are shooting but does not fall into a pocket, the result of the shot stands.
2. If a ball that is frozen to the cue ball moves as the cue ball leaves its original position on a shot, whether or not it was moved by the cue ball or settled on its own is determined solely by the referee's judgment.
3. If a ball is hanging on the lip of a pocket and falls into that pocket by itself after being stationary for five seconds or longer, it will be replaced as closely as possible to the position it was in prior to falling. The five-second count does not begin until all balls in play have stopped moving. Whether the shooter remains at the table does not affect the five-second period.
4. If a hanging ball drops into a pocket by itself while balls are in motion during a shot, the ruling depends on the ensuing action of the balls:
a. If no ball passes through the area originally occupied by the hanging ball, it is restored and play will continue.
b. If the cue ball, before contacting another ball, passes through the area originally occupied by the hanging ball and, without contacting any other balls, either scratches or remains on the table, both the cue ball and the object ball are restored to their prior positions and you shoot again. (A.R. 1-49)
c. If the shot is legal and any ball passes through the area originally occupied by the hanging ball, including the cue ball with or without scratching, and any other balls are contacted by such a ball at any point during the shot, a referee will attempt to restore the position prior to the shot and you shoot again. If restoration is not possible, the game will be replayed with the player who broke the game breaking again. (A.R. 1-49)
d. If the shot is illegal because the cue ball first contacts an illegal object ball before it or any other ball passes through the area originally occupied by the hanging ball, it is a foul. The incoming player accepts the object balls in position. If the hanging ball is designated by specific game rules as the game winning ball it must be restored, otherwise it is not restored.

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